Romance Semester

Spring Semester

Cohort: 2018

Semester 2

1. Seminar: The History of Romance

This ten-week course defines the modern romance novel written in English and traces its development from 1740 through the 2010s. The definition and literary history of the romance novel will provide students with a clearer understanding of the genre’s nature and scope and will also form the basis for a counterargument to the widespread disdain for and condemnation of this literary genre. Students review critical responses to romance, define and analyze the romance genre’s essential elements, discover a partial remedy for the critical ignorance of the genre’s scope, and explore the history from Samuel Richardson’s Pamelathrough the 20thCentury. This exploration will uncover the hidden virtues of the romance genre largely hidden from mainstream literary culture.

2. Genre: Primary Texts in Romance

This course provides primary texts within the genre of romance for students to read examples of these genres from the history of romance in their seminar class. The course content covers the modern romance novel written in English and traces its development from 1740 through the 1990s. Reading primary texts that represent eras of history provide a clearer understanding of the genre’s nature and scope and will also help students understand, in depth and from their own experience of the genre, the basis for an opinion on the widespread disdain for and condemnation of this literary genre. Students begin by exploring Samuel Richardson’s Pamelathrough 20thCentury romance. This exploration will uncover the hidden virtues of the romance genre largely unrealized by mainstream literary culture.

3. Toolbox: How to Write Romance

What makes a romance novel a romance? Writing a well-structured romance isn’t the same as writing any other genre—something the popular novel and screenwriting guides don’t address. The romance arc is made up of its own story beats, and the external plot and theme need to be braided to the romance arc—not the other way around.

4. Practicum: Original Student Work & Workshop

In this course, you will produce your own pieces of creative writing for workshop review and feedback from your classmates and instructor. We take a “fly on the wall” approach to the workshop in which the author of the piece being discussed is allowed to only listen to the feedback and discussion of the readers. In other words, your writing stands on its own and speaks for itself; you are not permitted to explain or defend the piece. This approach to the workshop allows authors the rare opportunity to hear readers’ reactions to their own writing without feeling pressure to discuss their piece, inspiration, backstory, or offer further insight or defense of what they have written.

5. Business: Blogging for Profit

Having an effective writer platform has never been more important than it is right now. A writer platform is one of the best tools you can use to combat publishing challenges. This class explores the process of gaining visibility in the literary marketplace and shows you how to market yourself and your work effectively & efficiently. Learn how to create a writer’s platform, sell books, make more money, and launch a successful career as an author. This class explores “old-school” methods of platform building, such as public speaking and networking, as well as newer methods of platform building, such as blogs and social media; examines case studies of authors who developed successful platforms and suggests ways to formulate your own platform strategy.

6. Language: Contemporary Literary Criticism

Literary theory has developed in several different ways in the 21stcentury, but the most predominant fact is that theory has turned into a multifaceted endeavor. Instead of looking at specific schools, we will now look at a variety of concepts of vital significance for literary studies today.We will cover themes like: Love and Ideology, The Uncanny, Eco & Animals, Character and Voice, Suspense and Secrets, Body and Mutant, Laughter and The Tragic, Desire and Queer, Pleasure and Wounds, and Feelings & Me